Carbon Washington's I-732 Media

A grassroots organization focused on accelerating
the transition to a vibrant clean-energy economy.

We advocate for carbon reduction policies that are effective, equitable, economically sound, evidence-based, and politically feasible.

Carbon Washington is part of ACT NOW

ACT NOW (Advocates for a Carbon Tax NOW) is a growing coalition of volunteers and more than 30 organizations including Carbon Washington, Audubon Washington, Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL), League of Women Voters, American Sustainable Business Council, Conservatives for Environmental Reform, and others that want to see a carbon tax pass here in Washington State.
 

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News

We support the carbon fee initiative I-1631 + news

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Hello, CarbonWA friends:

We Support I-1631! 

After another round of legislative inaction, a ballot initiative is moving forward to put a price on carbon. We’ve taken a close look at the policy, collected feedback from our supporters, and held a robust internal discussion about the initiative. As a result, we are moving forward in support of I-1631. You can see our full statement below. But, before you make up your own mind, we’d encourage you to review our recent in-depth analysis of the initiative (including a comparison matrix, exploration of wonky details, and a carbon reduction ranking).

While the 1631 policy differs in some ways from the approaches we’ve seen in recent years, we also see it as an outgrowth of the grassroots energy that put the first carbon tax in the nation on the ballot and has since led to a surge of serious legislative proposals. I-1631 also has the extra boost of a very favorable ballot title ruling from the Attorney General’s office (something the I-732 effort struggled with), and a recent upholding of the title against legal challenges from the Association of Washington Business and a conservative activist (who we don’t know much about except that his website logo is of sasquatch toppling the Olympia capitol). Read on for the reasoning behind our support of I-1631. (more…)

Analysis of the new carbon initiative + GoGreen Conference!

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Hello, CarbonWA friends: There’s a new initiative in town — which we’ve broken down for you — and two fantastic climate conferences are coming up in April! Don’t fret if this is our last newsletter for a few weeks. Some of our key leaders are heading out on vacation and the next big climate move will be seeing if I-1631 goes forward to the ballot.

Carbon pricing policy analysis (including I-1631!) 

While the carbon tax bill that we supported in the legislature, SB 6203, passed out of two committees in the Senate, stalled, and ultimately failed to pass this year, the carbon pricing debate has never been more alive. Initiative 1631, which would create a carbon fee, has been filed, and the core sponsors (including The Nature Conservancy, Alliance for Jobs and Clean Energy, and some of Washington’s tribal nations) are preparing to move forward. If you want to get involved with the initiative, check out this page. We’ve put together an in-depth analysis of the initiative and how it compares to the major previous proposals we’ve seen, including SB 6203 and I-732. Our analysis blog includes a comparison matrix, exploration of wonky details, a carbon reduction ranking — and we even included pictures and graphs! So please check out our blog. You can also download PDFs of the blog post, the policy matrix, and the price trajectory chart.

We are pleased that the sponsors of I-1631 have put a plan on the table, but we will wait to see it move forward with signature gathering before commenting further. The measure has until early July to get the signatures to qualify. Take a look at the analysis and then let us know what you think about the initiative. Email Kyle@carbonwa.org to send us your input!  (more…)

Carbon Washington Statement on SB 6203

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Statement from Kyle Murphy, Executive Director, Carbon Washington

After a decade of inaction on climate change, our elected leaders have a duty and obligation to enact public policy to reduce carbon. It is clear that people in Washington want action. The legislature’s continued failure to do so is disturbing.

SB 6203 made history as the first carbon tax in the country to be voted out of two legislative committees, and by coming within a single vote or two in the Senate. The support from environmental, tribal, and business interests was groundbreaking and builds on considerable progress in Washington to elevate a conversation about climate change and a price on carbon. While I-732, the nation’s first carbon tax initiative put to Washington voters in 2016 didn’t pass at the polls, it was the basis for four carbon pricing bills introduced in the 2017 legislature, and created an opportunity for the legislature to seriously consider SB 6203 in the 2018 session.

Climate action in Washington is coming. Opponents of this bill achieved little beyond a temporary delay in our inevitable trajectory toward a clean energy future. Carbon Washington will now focus its efforts on putting a price on carbon this year at the ballot or next year in the legislature.

Future generations are counting on us, and we will continue to mobilize citizens, provide leadership, and advocate for effective, equitable, economically sound, evidence-based, and politically feasible policies to address climate change.

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A strong, steadily rising price on carbon pollution is the most effective... policy tool for reducing emissions. I-1631 would enact a meaningful price on carbon while funding projects to advance clean energy resources...
#YesOn1631 #CarbonFee #ActOnClimate

We support the carbon fee initiative I-1631 + news | Carbon Washington

Hello, CarbonWA friends: We Support I-1631!  After another round of legislative inaction, a ballot initiative is moving forward to put a price on c...

ow.ly

Lightbulb moment 💡for utilities & automakers: "use the batteries inside electric cars as storage for the entire public power grid." Check out how this “vehicle-to-grid” idea can transform #electricity to become more renewable! #RenewableEnergy #PowerGrid

Your Future Home Might Be Powered By Car Batteries

It was a light-bulb moment for a tinkerer in the countryside outside Dublin.

www.bloomberg.com

We love seeing companies take the lead! Thanks @Apple for going 100% clean energy!

"We're committed to leaving the world better than we found it." - @tim_cook

#CleanEnergy #Apple #CSR

Apple Now Globally Powered by 100% Renewables

All of Apple's retail stores, offices, data centers and co-located facilities in 43 countries now use renewable energy sources.

www.ecowatch.com

Great news from the @IMOHQ: "Most nations that are members of the UN body agreed to reduce total annual global shipping industry greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50% by 2050 compared to 2008 levels."

#CutEmissions #GreenhouseGas #CleanAir

Shipping Industry Agrees To Historic Global Emissions Cut

www.energymanagertoday.com

On Thursday a Federal Magistrate judge in Eugene set a trial date (October 23rd) for a case that pits 21 young people against the Trump Administration. The young plaintiffs say climate change is a violation of their constitutional rights.

Date Set For Youth Climate Lawsuit in Eugene

A Federal Magistrate judge in Eugene Thursday set a trial date for a case that pits 21 young people against the Trump Administration over climate chan...

klcc.org

The head of @UNEnvironment @ErikSolheim shares the impact of #solar: “The extraordinary surge in solar investment around the world shows how much can be achieved when we commit to growth without harming the environment.” #Renewable #EnergyAlternatives

The world is now spending more on renewable energy than coal, gas and nuclear power combined

Global investment in renewable energy shot up last year, far outstripping investment in fossil fuels, according to a UN report. As the price of cle...

www.independent.co.uk

Thought-provoking questions pondered by a science journalist, mother, and once upon a time off-the-grid homesteader...
"What do we want kids to learn from their first lessons about climate change?"
#ScienceEducation #ClimateChange #Communication

How I Talk to My Daughter About Climate Change

As a reporter covering the environment, I'm all too aware of what the next 50 years could hold. As a 9-year-old, she's not—and for now, she wants...

www.theatlantic.com

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What People Are Saying About Reducing Carbon Pollution

“I’m a Republican. I believe that the greenhouse effect is real, that CO2 emissions generated by man is creating our greenhouse gas effect that traps heat, and the planet is warming. A price on carbon — that’s the way to go in my view.”

Lindsey Graham, United States Senator, R-SC

A carbon tax is a good starting point for working toward eventual state and federal agreements that put a price on carbon emissions. If national elder statesmen in the Republican Party can take this idea seriously, so should other Republicans in our statehouse and in Congress. The same goes for Democrats.

The Olympian

"Climate change is the biggest market failure of our time. If the United States is to continue to lead and innovate, we must move away from fossil fuels and focus on developing clean, inexpensive, renewable energy sources. A price on carbon is the best policy to promote this change."

Jim McDermott, Former U.S. Representative (D-WA 7th District)

Scientists and economists agree that the most effective way to free ourselves from fossil fuels is to stop the free lunch for polluters.

Sightline Institute

"Only when 'the economic and social costs of using up shared environmental resources are recognized with transparency and fully borne by those who incur them, not by other peoples or future generations,’ [Pope Benedict XVI] can those actions be considered ethical."

Pope Francis, Encyclical Letter “Laudato si”

The optimal solution is a carbon tax (offset by equivalent tax cuts elsewhere) — the most efficient and market-friendly way to address the negative externalities of energy use. But that approach is highly transparent and less susceptible to manipulation by special-interest lobbying than complicated regulatory schemes. No wonder it never gets any traction.

Richmond Times-Dispatch

“I think that climate change is real. I think that one of the great tragedies of our lives is the Great Barrier Reef dying [and] the environmental consequences of that."

John McCain, United States Senator (R-Arizona)

It is time for more of our elected leaders to join [Governor] Inslee, [and Senators] Carlyle and Palumbo in giving this major issue the attention and care it deserves.

Seattle Times Editorial, Feb. 5, 2018

"If national governments won't take action, your community can . . . We can move our economy town-by-town, state-by-state to renewable energy and a sustainable future." (Watch this dramatic video narrated by DiCaprio.)

Leonardo DiCaprio, Actor and environmentalist

Who We Are

Carbon Washington consists of students, activists, scientists, economists and concerned citizens across the state. All of us believe that we have a moral obligation to reduce carbon pollution and promote clean, renewable energy.

In 2016, we mounted a statewide campaign to pass Initiative 732 — the revenue-neutral carbon tax we proposed. Economists say carbon taxes are the single-most effective way to get polluters to stop polluting. More than 360,000 citizens signed our petition (a near-record number).

Our initiative was endorsed by a bipartisan group of citizens, business leaders, scientists, economists, public officials, and social and environmental leaders. It attracted worldwide attention. And although the measure did not pass, more than 1.25 million Washingtonians voted in favor of I-732.

Now Carbon Washington is charting its future. We are focused on making an impact in 2018 at the state and local level. We’re exploring 2018 ballot measures, legislative bills, and actions that cities can take to cut carbon and unleash clean energy.

Longer-term, we are evolving into an organization that will help design, promote and pass carbon-reduction policies — policies that are effective, equitable, economically sound, evidence-based, and politically feasible — in Washington State and elsewhere.

You can help us by signing up for our weekly email blast, connecting with us on Facebook and Twitter, and donating so we can do the hard work that needs to be done. You can also join one of our chapters across the state. 

Contact Us

Have a question? Give us a shout!

Please email info@carbonwa.org or call Carbon Washington headquarters at 206-632-1805

Media inquiries only
Please email communications@carbonwa.org or call Samara Villasenor at 206-478-5643. For time-sensitive requests, contact Executive Director Kyle Murphy at (360) 704-0484 or via email at kyle@carbonwa.org.

Office phone
206-632-1805

Mailing address
PO Box 85565
Seattle, WA 98145-1565

Street address
1914 N 34th St., Suite 407
Seattle, WA 98103

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