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Moving Washington State toward zero carbon emissions

Carbon Washington is part of ACT NOW

ACT NOW (Advocates for a Carbon Tax NOW) is a growing coalition of volunteers and more than 30 organizations including Carbon Washington, Audubon Washington, Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL), League of Women Voters, American Sustainable Business Council, Conservatives for Environmental Reform, and others that want to see a carbon tax pass here in Washington State.
 

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News

Forward Together + Month of Action + Carbon Tax Comeback

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Hello, CarbonWA friends: We hope the holiday season has brought joy to you and your families. For us, it also brought introspection about how we can best advance our shared goals of a low-carbon, healthy, prosperous future.

To that end, read on for our reflections, a policy update, and what YOU CAN DO to advance climate action.

Together Is the Way Forward

We still face the challenge of constructing a climate policy that appeals to people who want action but who have different ideas about how to implement it. Those differences in perspectives have contributed to several setbacks in recent years. The defeat of Initiative 1631 in November followed a loss for Initiative 732 in 2016 and the absence of legislation from lawmakers the last two legislative sessions. Tellingly, some who liked one of the initiatives did not support the other. In fact, I-1631 received more support than I-732 in certain counties, while losing support compared to I-732 in other counties (more on 1631 v 732 here), underscoring the divergence in views. Pragmatism, bipartisanship, and compromise are desperately needed to get further next time.

Still, the election results gave us some help despite the loss of I-1631. Five of the seven climate champions Carbon Washington endorsed and campaigned for won their races. We have never been better positioned to pass climate legislation in Olympia. (more…)

Support Climate Action on Giving Tuesday

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Hello, CarbonWA friends: Read on for a few reasons why we hope you’ll donate to CarbonWA this Giving Tuesday. Your gift won’t disappear in a large multi-faceted nonprofit budget; it goes straight to lean education, policy development and political advocacy efforts to bring smart climate action to Washington State.

Click Here to Support CarbonWA This Giving Tuesday

Why CarbonWA?

We Elected Climate Champions

We embarked on a new effort this year to elect a climate majority to the state legislature. Our work culminated in the first ever Climate Voters Guide and a program of active campaigning in key legislative races. 5 out of the 7 key candidates we campaigned for WON their election. Thanks in part to your support of our efforts, there will be more climate advocates in the legislature than ever before. 

/var/folders/wd/gsl8x9wd0wqb8gnlzgdjgp_40000gn/T/com.microsoft.Word/WebArchiveCopyPasteTempFiles/collage%20no%20words.jpgWe Led Grassroots Efforts For a Legislative Carbon Tax

Last spring, CarbonWA was at the forefront of a legislative effort to pass a carbon tax. While the bill ultimately fell short, it was groundbreaking in that it brought new stakeholders to the table, passed out of two committees for the first time in the country, won support from the Seattle Times, and helped to inform the work of our colleagues in Massachusetts and across the country. CarbonWA provided robust grassroots lobbying and policy development support in the process. Neither the bill or the process were perfect, but for the first time in recent years climate action was one of the top things on the agenda in Olympia.

 (more…)

What’s next for climate action + CarbonWA candidates win!

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Hello, CarbonWA friends: There is no way around it — the results for climate action this election were mixed. Read on for our take on I-1631, the results from CarbonWA’s efforts to elect climate champions, and the future for climate action in Washington. Thank you to the hundreds of volunteers who worked on the initiative and volunteered for our legislative climate champions. You inspire us to continue.

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Jared Mead

Climate Champions Win Legislative Seats!

We embarked on a new effort this year to elect a climate majority to the state legislature. Our work culminated in the first ever Climate Voters’ Guide and a program of active campaigning in key legislative races. We are thrilled that 5 out of the 7 key climate races we campaigned in are trending our way! 

Dr. Sharon Shewmake

Climate champions Sharon Shewmake, Jared Mead and Debra Entenman are poised to unseat climate do-nothings in the House. In the Senate, Emily Randall is narrowly ahead. Moderate Republican Mark Miloscia lost his Senate seat, but his challenger Claire Wilson is also a climate champion who earned our endorsement. (more…)

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"America’s carbon dioxide emissions rose by 3.4 percent in 2018, the biggest increase in eight years"

Click the link below to see a graph of U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions from 1990 to 2018

#Co2 #ClimateChange #Emissions

Passenger planes at the Phoenix airport in July. Greenhouse gas emissions from airplanes and trucking increased sharply in 2018.

U.S. Carbon Emissions Surged in 2018 Even as Coal Plants Closed

America‘s carbon dioxide emissions rose by 3.4 percent in 2018, the biggest increase in eight years.

www.nytimes.com

"Voters are ready to think about resilience, but they want and deserve more — a message of American renewal that moves us boldly toward a more prosperous, cleaner, revitalized nation."

#2020 #ClimateLeader #ClimateChange

Help wanted: A climate champion for the 2020 election

A presidential candidate who makes climate change a campaign centerpiece will energize young people and inspire voters.

www.desmoinesregister.com

A thought-provoking piece from Thomas Friedman on The Green New Deal, how it has evolved over time, and the urgency of change.

#GreenDeal #ClimateChange #CarbonPriceMe

A technician monitoring turbines at a wind farm in Glenrock, Wy.

Opinion | The Green New Deal Rises Again

It was a good idea that didn‘t catch on in 2007. Now we‘re running out of time.

www.nytimes.com

Have fun with going #PlasticFree from @NatGeo
"Think of it as a resolution to shed some pounds: scientists estimate that some 18 billion pounds of plastic waste flows into the oceans every year."
#Resolution #LessPlastic #2019

Easy ways families can use less plastic in the new year

You and your kids can make a difference in the fight against global plastic pollution. And it can be fun.

www.nationalgeographic.com

"According to the Global Carbon Project... after three years in which emissions remained largely flat, global levels of carbon dioxide increased by 1.6 percent in 2017 and are on pace to jump by 2.7 percent [in 2018]"
#CO2 #GlobalCarbonProject #Emissions

Opinion | Trump Imperils the Planet

Endangered species, climate change — the administration is taking the country, and the world, backward.

www.nytimes.com

Start the new year with a thorough look at #ClimatePolicy options from the @LCPInstitute

"[The] three major policy building blocks available for reducing carbon pollution: pricing mechanisms, subsidies, and regulations."

#CarbonPricing #ClimateChange

Review of Climate Policy Options – Low Carbon Prosperity Institute

A primer on the three major policy building blocks available for reducing carbon pollution: pricing mechanisms, subsidies, and regulations

www.lowcarbonprosperity.org

"The story of climate change in 2018 was complicated — overwhelmingly bad, yet with two reasons for hope. The bad and the good were connected, too: Thanks to the changing weather, more Americans seem to be waking up to the problem."

#ClimateChange #2018

In Lynn Haven, Fla., trees were upended by a hurricane in October.

Opinion | The Story of 2018 Was Climate Change

Future generations may ask why we were distracted by lesser matters.

www.nytimes.com

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What People Are Saying About Reducing Carbon Pollution

“I’m a Republican. I believe that the greenhouse effect is real, that CO2 emissions generated by man is creating our greenhouse gas effect that traps heat, and the planet is warming. A price on carbon — that’s the way to go in my view.”

Lindsey Graham, United States Senator, R-SC

A carbon tax is a good starting point for working toward eventual state and federal agreements that put a price on carbon emissions. If national elder statesmen in the Republican Party can take this idea seriously, so should other Republicans in our statehouse and in Congress. The same goes for Democrats.

The Olympian

"Climate change is the biggest market failure of our time. If the United States is to continue to lead and innovate, we must move away from fossil fuels and focus on developing clean, inexpensive, renewable energy sources. A price on carbon is the best policy to promote this change."

Jim McDermott, Former U.S. Representative (D-WA 7th District)

Scientists and economists agree that the most effective way to free ourselves from fossil fuels is to stop the free lunch for polluters.

Sightline Institute

"Only when 'the economic and social costs of using up shared environmental resources are recognized with transparency and fully borne by those who incur them, not by other peoples or future generations,’ [Pope Benedict XVI] can those actions be considered ethical."

Pope Francis, Encyclical Letter “Laudato si”

The optimal solution is a carbon tax (offset by equivalent tax cuts elsewhere) — the most efficient and market-friendly way to address the negative externalities of energy use. But that approach is highly transparent and less susceptible to manipulation by special-interest lobbying than complicated regulatory schemes. No wonder it never gets any traction.

Richmond Times-Dispatch

“I think that climate change is real. I think that one of the great tragedies of our lives is the Great Barrier Reef dying [and] the environmental consequences of that."

John McCain, United States Senator (R-Arizona)

It is time for more of our elected leaders to join [Governor] Inslee, [and Senators] Carlyle and Palumbo in giving this major issue the attention and care it deserves.

Seattle Times Editorial, Feb. 5, 2018

"If national governments won't take action, your community can . . . We can move our economy town-by-town, state-by-state to renewable energy and a sustainable future." (Watch this dramatic video narrated by DiCaprio.)

Leonardo DiCaprio, Actor and environmentalist

Who We Are

Carbon Washington consists of students, businesspeople, scientists, retirees, activists and concerned citizens across the state. All of us believe that we have a moral obligation to reduce carbon pollution and promote clean, renewable energy.

In 2016, we mounted a statewide campaign to pass Initiative 732 — the revenue-neutral carbon tax we proposed. Economists say carbon taxes are the single-most effective way to get polluters to stop polluting.

Although the measure didn’t pass, more than 1.25 million Washingtonians voted in favor of I-732. In 2018, we supported Initiative 1631, another attempt to put a price on carbon that also fell short of the 50-percent mark.

Now we’re broadening our focus with a redefined vision and mission. We’re exploring legislative bills, ballot measures and other bipartisan approaches that make a meaningful difference while appealing to a broad array of citizens.

Our vision: Net zero carbon emissions and a prosperous, healthy future

Mission: Increase demand for climate action and fight for smart carbon policies

Goals and essential actions:

Create the political will to pass smart statewide climate policy

Propose and advocate for effective carbon-reducing measures

(Download our complete vision, mission and goals in PDF form here.)

Are we effective? Former State Sen. Paul Graves says, “Reducing carbon pollution without harming jobs and families is a tough challenge. It requires thoughtfulness, a clear view of the evidence and the tradeoffs, and a willingness to work with people on both sides of the aisle and both sides of the state. I’m grateful to Carbon Washington for embodying those values.”

You can help us by signing up for our weekly email blast, connecting with us on Facebook and Twitter, and donating so we can do the hard work that needs to be done. You can also join one of our chapters across the state. 

Contact Us

Have a question? Give us a shout!

Please email info@carbonwa.org or call Carbon Washington
Executive Director Kyle Murphy at 206-480-1176.

Media inquiries only
Please email communications@carbonwa.org or call Samara Villasenor at 206-478-5643.

Mailing address
PO Box 85565
Seattle, WA 98145-1565

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